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Posts tagged ‘Yahuah’

Aleph-Bet Soup – Body Codes

The Body Codes with Chuck Thurston, a teaching on the human body and how the organs of our bodies correspond to the Kingdom of Heaven.

Dr. Thurston’s goal is to provide believers with scientific evidence that re-establishes the Bible as completely true and authentic. He also focus on the many infallible proofs that may persuade honest seekers of truth that the Bible is what they have been looking for, and is a scientific reality in ways they could never have imagined. In his brilliantly composed book is a well-balanced meal of spiritual vitamins and minerals, bringing nourishment and new life to your thirsty and hungry soul. It was inspired by his deep love and holy respect for the Word of God. The mini lesson below should help you understand one of many reasons why Dr. Thurston has a passion for the Holy Scriptures.

The Hebrew Aleph-Bet comprises twenty-two letters. This equates to the astonishing fact that the human body also is designated with twenty-two amino acids, all of which are vital to a healthy and productive life on earth. The biblical Hebrew text, which uses those twenty-two letters, is precisely written with a uniquely interwoven mathematical system; yet it retains a poetical and musical sound as you listen to a fluent speaker of the language. Its message is consistent throughout, as it invites the reader to linger at the Master’s buffet table of spiritual insights, eating and digesting soul-satisfying thoughts of eternal life.

Finally, I encourage you, dear reader, to consume this wonderful, spiritual food with an attitude of open-mindedness and a hungry, searching heart. So, let us sit down together at the Master’s table, relax, and sip our Aleph-Bet Soup. It is for you, because it is just what the doctor ordered!
In Psalm 34:8, the Lord admonishes us to taste of Him. “O taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.” – Yacov Rambsel

Download the book Here

 

 

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The Digital Dead Sea Scrolls

Discovery

The first seven Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered by chance in 1947 by Bedouin of the Ta’amra tribe, in a cave (later given the name “Cave 1”) near Khirbet Qumran on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea. Three of the scrolls were immediately purchased by archaeologist Eliezer Lipa Sukenik on behalf of the Hebrew University; the others were bought by the Metropolitan of the Syrian Orthodox Church in Jerusalem, Mar Athanasius Samuel. In 1948 Samuel smuggled the four scrolls in his possession to the United States; it was only in 1954 that Sukenik’s son, Yigael Yadin, also an archaeologist, was able to return them to Israel, and they were ultimately entrusted to the Shrine of the Book Foundation. They have been on display in the Shrine of the Book at The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, since 1965.

Over the next few years, from 1949 to 1956, additional fragments of some 950 different scrolls were discovered in ten nearby caves, both by Bedouins and by a joint archaeological expedition of the École Biblique et Archéologique Française and the Rockefeller Museum, under the direction of Professor Father Roland de Vaux. The richest yield, from Cave 4, just opposite the site of Qumran, consisted of some 15,000 fragments. The last cave, Cave 11, was discovered in 1956, and the scrolls found there were in a reasonable state of preservation. Since then, only a few small scraps of parchment have been found in the Judean Desert (though not in the close vicinity of Qumran).

Apart from the first seven scrolls, which are entrusted to the Israel Museum, the majority of the fragments found by archaeologists and Bedouin are property of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). Others are in the possession of institutions outside of Israel, such as the Jordan Archaeological Museum in Amman and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in Paris, or in private hands (the Schøyen Collection, Norway).

thanksgiving

 

The Great Isaiah Scroll

viewer-Isaiah

The Great Isaiah Scroll (1QIsaa) is one of the original seven Dead Sea Scrolls discovered in Qumran in 1947. It is the largest (734 cm) and best preserved of all the biblical scrolls, and the only one that is almost complete. The 54 columns contain all 66 chapters of the Hebrew version of the biblical Book of Isaiah. Dating from ca. 125 BCE, it is also one of the oldest of the Dead Sea Scrolls, some one thousand years older than the oldest manuscripts of the Hebrew Bible known to us before the scrolls’ discovery.

The version of the text is generally in agreement with the Masoretic or traditional version codified in medieval codices, such as the Aleppo Codex, but it contains many variant readings, alternative spellings, scribal errors, and corrections. Unlike most of the biblical scrolls from Qumran, it exhibits a very full orthography (spelling), revealing how Hebrew was pronounced in the Second Temple Period. Around twenty additional copies of the Book of Isaiah were also found at Qumran (one more copy was discovered further south at Wadi Muraba’at), as well as six pesharim (commentaries) based on the book; Isaiah is also frequently quoted in other scrolls (a literary and religious phenomenon also present in New Testament writings). The authoritative and scriptural status of the Book of Isaiah is consistent with the messianic beliefs of the community living at Qumran, since Isaiah is known for his prophecies of judgment and consolation, and his visions of the End of Days and the coming of the Kingdom of God.

The War Scroll

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The War Scroll (1QM), popularly known as “The War of the Sons of Light Against the Sons of Darkness,” is one of the seven original Dead Sea Scrolls discovered in Qumran in 1947. It contains 19 columns (originally there were at least twenty), of which the first 14–19 lines (out of at least 21–22) are preserved. The work is written in Hebrew in a square Herodian script and is dated to the late first century BCE or early first century CE. Seven additional fragments (4Q491-497) with similar contents have also been found, but the relationship between these texts to 1QM is not entirely clear; they may represent an earlier version of the War Scroll, or source materials on which the War Scroll was based.

Against the backdrop of a long biblical tradition concerning a final war at the End of Days (Ezekiel 38–39; Daniel 7–12), this scroll describes a seven stage, dualistic confrontation between the “Sons of Light” (the term used by Community members to refer to themselves), under the leadership of the “Prince of Light” (also called Michael, the Archangel) – and the “Sons of Darkness” (a nickname for the enemies of the Community, Jews and non-Jews alike), aided by a nation called the Kittim (Romans?), headed by Belial. The confrontation would last 49 years, terminating in the victory of the “Sons of Light” and the restoration of the Temple service and sacrifices. The War Scroll describes battle arrays, weaponry, the ages of the participants, and military maneuvers, recalling Hellenistic and Roman military manuals.

This work is not, strictly speaking, an apocalypse (namely, a heavenly revelation), and it lacks a “messianic” figure. Certain details, such as the advanced age of the combatants and the leadership of the priests, point to the idealistic nature of the war described in the work and impart a fictional quality to the treatise. Nonetheless, the War Scroll may indeed reflect genuine political tension in Judea between Romans and Jews, which would culminate in the outbreak of revolt in 66 CE. The scroll also sheds light on the New Testament Book of Revelation, in which a final war is also described between earthly and heavenly forces.

The Temple Scroll

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The Temple Scrolla (11Q19) was almost certainly discovered in 1956 in Cave 11, located about two kilometers north of Khirbet Qumran. The manuscript is written in Hebrew in the square Herodian script of the late Second Temple Period (the first half of the first century CE), on extremely thin animal skin (one-tenth of a millimeter), making it the thinnest parchment scroll ever found in the caves of Qumran. Two other copies of the same composition have also come to light: one in Cave 11 (Temple Scrollb [11Q20]), and another (possibly a fragmentary copy of the last part of the work) in Cave 4 (4QTemple Scrollb [4Q524]). Most scholars believe that all three manuscripts are copies of an original work composed in the Land of Israel in the second half of the second century BCE (after 120 BCE, perhaps during the rule of John Hyrcanus I).

The Temple Scrolla consists of 18 sheets of parchment, each of which has three or four columns of text. The scroll’s total length is 8.146 meters; it is thus the largest scroll ever discovered in the Qumran caves. Its second half – the inner portion of the scroll – is better preserved than the first.

The work claims to provide the details of God’s instructions (to Moses?) in regard to the construction and operation of the Temple. It was evidently supposed to be a kind of “new Book of Moses,” which systematically combines the laws of the Temple and the sacrifices (mainly from the books of Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers) with a new version of these laws as articulated in Deuteronomy chapters 12–23.

The Temple compound, as described in the scroll, was to be arranged in three concentric square courts, meant to resemble the camp of the Israelites in the desert. Just as the Tabernacle stood at the center of the Israelite camp, so too the utopian Temple was to stand at the center of the inner court, with the altar for burnt offerings and other objects near it, radiating its holiness to the whole of the Jewish People and the Land of Israel, as the Tabernacle did in the time of the Israelites’ wandering in the desert.

A central question relates to the social provenance of this work: While the scroll shares many features in common with the other sectarian works discovered in the caves near Qumran, several representative expressions, such as the phrase “Sons of Light,” and concepts, such as the belief in predestination, are lacking. Many scholars still attribute the Temple Scroll to the isolated community living at Qumran. But others reject any connection with the Qumran community, affirming that the work originated in certain priestly (possible Zadokite) circles, and that the scroll was hidden in the cave by priestly Zealots during their flight from Jerusalem, before its destruction by the Romans in 70 CE.

The Community Rule

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The Community Rule (Serekh Hayahad, 1QS), formerly called the “Manual of Discipline,” is the major section of one of the first seven scrolls discovered in Cave 1 at Qumran in 1947. Written in Hebrew in a square Hasmonean script, it was copied between 100 and 75 BCE.

In addition to this manuscript, fragments of no less than ten additional copies of the work were found in Cave 4 (4Q255-264), and two tiny fragments of another copy came to light in Cave 5 (5Q11). The copy from Cave 1 is the best preserved and contains the longest version of the text known to us. On the basis of comparison with the fragments from Cave 4, however, scholars have concluded that the manuscript from Cave 1 represents a late stage in the evolution of the composition.

The Community Rule is a sectarian work, crucial for understanding the Community’s way of life. It deals with such subjects as the admission of new members, conduct at communal meals, and even theological doctrines (such as the belief in cosmic dualism and in predestination). The picture that emerges from the scroll is one of a communal, ascetic life governed by rigorous rules, which transformed the members of the Community into “priests in spirit,” who lived sacred lives in a “spiritual temple.” The Community members patterned their daily lives in symbolic imitation of the lives of the priests serving in the Temple by praying and performing ritual ablutions, thereby acting in blatant opposition to the “defiled” physical Temple in Jerusalem.

At this time, rule literature was a new genre, which would later become part of the Christian monastic tradition (for example, the sixth-century Rule of Saint Benedict). The discovery of the Community Rule at Qumran is the earliest evidence for the existence of the genre in Western civilization. The importance of this work lies in the fact that it provides a rare opportunity to learn about the lives of the sectarians, whom we assume to be Essenes, through their own rule literature. Prior to the discovery of the scrolls, little was known about the Essenes apart from the evidence of classical sources (Flavius Josephus, Philo, and Pliny the Elder), as well as a few hints in rabbinic literature

The Commentary on Habakkuk Scroll

viewer-Habakkuk

The Commentary on Habakkuk (Pesher Habakkuk, 1QpHab), is a relative complete scroll (1.48 m long) and one of the seven original Dead Sea Scrolls discovered in caves of Qumran in 1947. It interprets the first two chapters of the biblical book of the prophet Habakkuk and comprises 13 columns written in Hebrew, in a clear, square Herodian script. However, the tetragrammaton, the four-letter, ineffable name of God, is written in ancient Hebrew characters, unlike the rest of the text. The scroll has been dated to the second half of the first century BCE.

In this work, the verses of the biblical book are copied paragraph by paragraph, in their original order. The scriptural text of Habakkuk on which the commentary is based, however, appears to be at variance from time to time with the Masoretic text. Each paragraph is accompanied by a commentary, introduced by the Hebrew word pishro, “its meaning,” or pesher hadavar al, “the meaning of the matter is in regard to.” The commentary uses a prophetic style to address events of the author’s time.

Two major subjects are treated in this composition. One relates to the internal religious politics of Jerusalem and the Temple priesthood, and the other – to the repercussions of the appearance of the Romans (called in the work Chaldeans or Kittim) on the historical scene. As in most of works of this genre, no historical personages are mentioned by name, but there are allusions to such individuals as “the Teacher of Righteousness,” “the Wicked Priest,” “the Man of Lies,” and others, whose exact identities have yet to be established.

This exceptionally well-preserved scroll is a key source of our knowledge of the spiritual life of the secluded Qumran community. It sheds light on the community’s perception of itself and serves as paradigm against which other examples of this genre (such as Pesher Nahum or Pesher Micah) are evaluated

VISIT:

The Digital Dead Sea Scrolls

http://dss.collections.imj.org.il/

The Way of YHWH

One of many peoples favorite past times is hiking through the peace and quiet of the wilderness. Before setting out on a hike there is one essential that no hiker should be without, a map.

The map identifies the landmarks and directions of the trail you are taking and without it one can easily become lost.

You might ask, what does hiking have to do with “the way of Yahweh?” Everything! It is the core teaching of God’s word.

We view the Bible from a western abstract perspective and view such Biblical words as law, commandments, righteousness, wickedness , judgment and repentance from an abstract point of view. But what will be presented here is a Biblical Hebraic point of view for these words which are the very same concrete concepts as taking a hike in the wilderness.

We will begin this investigation with the Hebrew word מדבר (midbar), usually translated as wilderness.

Because the Hebrew language is a root oriented system where all the words from any given root are related in meaning, it is beneficial to examine the root of any given word, as well as the other words that are derived from that root. In the case of the word midbar, the root is the three letters dalet-beyt-resh, davar, a Hebrew root meaning word. At first glance, their does not seem to be any connection between midbar meaning wilderness and DBR meaning word, that is until we dig a little deeper.

All three letter Hebrew roots, such as DBR, are themselves derived out of a two letter root or parent root. The parent root of DBR is the letters dalet and resh, DR, meaning a circle which is a symbol of order (it is interesting that our word order includes this ancient parent root). From DR come several three letter roots, each having to do with order.
GDR – To encircle or enclose to keep order
SDR – To set in order
AhDR – To arrange in order
DBR – To combine in order

Several words are derived out of the root DBR, each having to do with a combined order.
DaBaR – as a noun it means word, which when combined in order with other words, sentences are formed.
DaBaR – as a verb it means speech, a combination of words.
DeBoRah – is a bee, a colony of combined insects living in perfect harmony/order.
miDBaR – a place of harmony/order, the wilderness.

To see the Hebraic understanding of the wilderness as a place of harmony, we can contrast it with its understanding of a city, which in Hebrew is עיר (iyr). This word is derived out of the parent root ער (ar), meaning “enemy” and from this parent root is derived other words, each conveying the idea of chaos, the opposite of order.
Or – Blind
Ya’ar – Forest, a dark place
Sa’iyr – Goat, from its black hair
Erev – Evening, from its darkness

Anyone who has hiked in the wilderness has experienced its harmony and anyone who has walked the busy streets of a city has experienced its chaos.

As a people who live in the wilderness, the Hebrews are, by necessity, a nomadic people. A nomad survives on his livestock, usually sheep and goats, which supply him with hair and hide for his clothing and tents and meat and milk for his food. To sustain his livestock, and in turn himself, he must migrate from pasture to pasture.

This nomadic lifestyle is the foundation to the entire Hebrew language. Almost every word in the Hebrew language is rooted in this nomadic culture and without understanding the culture properly, misinterpretation and misunderstandings of the text are the result.

The Hebrew Yeshua vs. the Greek Jesus

Presenter: Nehemia Gordon

An astonishing realization has recently gripped the Christian world: “Jesus Christ” was not a blond-haired, blue-eyed Gentile. Yeshua of Nazareth was raised in an observant Jewish family in a culture where the Torah (five books of Moses) was the National Constitution. Yeshua’s teachings, which supposedly form the basis for Western Christianity, are now filtered through 2000 years of traditions born in ignorance of the land, language, and culture of the Bible.

The issues over which Yeshua wrestled with the Pharisees are simply not understood by modern Christians; nor are his most important instructions followed by those who claim to be his disciples. Former Pharisee, Nehemia Gordon, a Dead Sea Scrolls scholar and Semitic language expert, explores the ancient Hebrew text of the Gospel of Matthew from manuscripts long hidden away in the archives of Jewish scribes. Gordon’s research reveals that the more “modern” Greek text of Matthew, from which the Western world’s versions were translated, depicts “another Jesus” from the Yeshua portrayed in the ancient Hebrew version of Matthew. Gordon explains the life-and-death conflict Yeshua had with the Pharisees as they schemed to grab the reins of Judaism in the first century, and brings that conflict into perspective for both Jew and Christian alike.

The History Of Israel

History of Israel: Books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles

This is a time period that Israel was a nation under Kings. Before this they were under judges.

Joshua was the first judge.

I Samuel 17 David Kills Goliath, Abner end of 17 (Saul’s commanding general introduce David to Saul) 18 Chapter they sing Saul kills thousands, David’s kills his 10,000. David becomes commander of Saul’s guard. David must have been a very strong, valiant youth to take that position.

David was tough as nail when he went up against Goliath, he was not some scrawny kid. He was tough and under the hand of God. Chapter 19 Saul starts a campaign to kill David.

20+ years were of military age. Joshua and Caleb were the only two that God allowed to survive that were 20 years+

Judges — Ehud (Israel said that anyone that was left handed was evil, left is the word sinis in Latin -we get the word sinister from it), Deborah.

Judges 1 thumb and big toe cut off. If you cut off the thumb you ant hold a sword or spear. Cut off big toe, no balance, and would could not lead men into battle.

Sinai – Horeb (same name) this is where they get the law of God and this is the law they are to be keeping. If they did not then the four judgments of God was sent against them.

722 BC Assyria carries Northern Israel away. ; Southern Judah 586 BC carried away into captivity.

Go to the end of the books, 2 Kings and 2 Chronicles you will find the end of Israel history. These two book give you a synonymous viewpoint of the end of their history. Chronicles is looked at through the viewpoint of the priest. 1 & 2 Kings are the viewpoint of the kings of Israel. These two are the anointed ones, the two witness of Revelation 11. IT takes 2 witness according to Jewish law.

Gideon sent to annihilate in Judges. Judges 2 Joshua dies and they (Israel) goes back to pagan worship, Baal (tree and grove worship).

Samuel is the larder, the mouth of God for Israel. 1 Samuel 8 they ask for a king and Samuel warns them not to do this. Chapter 9 God elects Saul as their king. Chapter 16 David becomes king. Chapt. 13-15 Saul does not keep God commandments. Chapt. 14 Jonathan has the mind of Caleb and Joshua, Saul was against God. Deut 28 God promises that no matter how many, God would destroy their enemies. In chapt. 14 Saul takes credit. Chapt 15. Saul was told to destroys all, and Saul refuses. This is where God tells him his kingdom is finished. Saul is of the tribe of Benjamin, and the King must come form the tribe of Judah.

Chapt 16 – 31 David is the king in the eyes of God. 16-31 Saul is the king in the eyes of the people. c.17 kills Goliath, 18 David is made the guard

Joab is a killer and a murderer.

2 Samuel 24 David is numbering Israel. He is taking credit for all his victories. 1.8 million men that is his fighting force and that is why he is winning. He took credit for what God has done for him. This was a major mistake by David. IT was God that delivered David, not David.

I Kings is full blown Baal and grove worship.

I Kings – II Chronicles. Learn these chapters, you will understand most of what the rest of the bible is about.

I & II Kings and Chronicles. This is why they were scattered and brought back May 14th 1948.

Joseph sold into bondage in Egypt. They were in bondage for 400 years.

Jacob was Joseph father, Jacobs name was changed to Israel.

Isaac was Jacob Father, goes back to Abraham and the covenant was given to Abraham. The land of Israel was given to Abraham if they obeyed God. When they didn’t the four judgments of God was brought against them.

The Church today is spiritual Israel, the kingdom of God as the kingdom of God is now within you.

Moses was 40 when he killed an Egyptian (Ex 2). Ex 1 the Jews in Egypt were multiplying at a great rate, that the new Pharaoh said this must stop as the Jews were taking over.

586 B.C. Babylon takes away the Jews. 538 B.C. First decree given to rebuild the temple. They are being released.

Gen 15, Ex 7 400 years in bondage. Stephen tells the Sanhedrin the history of Israel.

Searching Hebrew In E-sword

How to obtain a more accurate search results in biblical languages using the e-sword search tool by esword101

 

Our Father is the Source, He is the Answer

What we can learn from the relationship seen between the words answer and humble in Hebrew by Ronen Gregory

Scriptures rendered in ancient pictograph Hebrew from aleppo codex, with sopherim changes reverted back to original readings.

Tanach In Original Script

Ancient Hebrew Script On E-Sword

How to enable and use the Ancient Hebrew Script on E-Sword by Ronen Gregory

Scriptures rendered in ancient pictograph Hebrew from aleppo codex, with sopherim changes reverted back to original readings.

Tanach In Original Script

Hebrew Wisdom Revealed – Know, Witness, Festival, Again

An examination showing the relationship between: know, knowledge, witness, testify, festival, again by Ronen Gregory

Hebrew Grammar Revealed-Aleph, Yod

A unique way to understand the Hebrew prefixes Aleph and Yod, showing how God is involved in all.

In my flesh I shall see God – DNA (Hebrew Lesson)

In my flesh I shall see God – Job 19:26 (Hebrew Lesson) Part 1

Brad Scott reveals how the design of the Hebrew Language is found embedded in all of God’s creation. The dynamics of Biblical Hebrew woven through agriculture and biology is a clear second witness to the supernatural revelation of the Word of God in our Bibles. Brad Scott discusses how the structure of the Word of God (linguistics) is found in agriculture and written on our DNA

Part 1

http://www.wildbranch.org (more…)

The Mystery of the God (ALEPH to TAV – A to Z)

Revelation 21:6

King James Version (KJV)

And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

From Aleph to Tav

The most common word in the Hebrew Bible is the word את (et). The first letter is the א, called an aleph, and is the first letter of the Hebrew alephbet. The second letter in the word את (et) is the ת, called a tav, and is the last letter of the Hebrew alephbet. These two letters are the “first and the last,” the “beginning and the end” and the “Aleph and the Tav” (which is translated as “the alpha and the omega,” the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, in the book of Revelation).

Joel 3:10

King James Version (KJV)

10 Beat your plowshares into swords and your pruninghooks into spears: let the weak say, I am strong.

The word “plowshares,” in the passage above, is the Hebrew word את (et). A plowshare is the metal point of the plow which digs into the soil creating a furrow for planting seeds. When we examine the original pictographic script used in ancient times to write Hebrew, we can see a clear connection between the letters of this word and its meaning.

The modern Hebrew form of the letter aleph is א, but is an evolved form of the original pictograph , a picture of an ox head. The ancient pictographic form of the letter ת is , a picture of two crossed sticks which are used as a marker. When these two pictographs are combined we have the meaning “an ox toward the mark.” Fields were plowed with a plow pulled behind an ox (or pair of oxen). In order to keep the furrows straight the driver of the ox would aim toward a mark, such as a tree or rock outcropping in the far distance. As we can see, this meaning of driving the ox toward a mark, can be seen in the letters of the Hebrew word את (et).

The word את is also used very frequently (over 7,000 times) in the Hebrew language such as can be seen in the very first verse of the Bible.

בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ׃

Because the word את has no equivalent in the English language, it is not translated, but to demonstrate its meaning in this verse I will translate Genesis 1:1 into English, but retain the word את in its correct position.

In the beginning Elohiym filled את the sky and את the land

The word את is used as a grammatical tool to identify the definite object of the verb. In the example of Genesis 1:1 the verb is the Hebrew word ברא (bara), meaning “to fill,” and the definite objects, the ones receiving the action of the verb, are the sky and the land. Just as the “ox” moved toward the “mark” when plowing, the word את (the plowshare) plows the path from the verb of a sentence (the ox) to the definite object (the mark).

Just as the phrase “heaven and earth” is an idiomatic expression meaning “all of creation,” the phrase “aleph and tav” is an idiomatic expression meaning “the whole of the alephbet.” It is the mission of the Ancient Hebrew Research Center to search out the history and meanings of the Ancient Hebrew alephbet, as well as the roots and words which are created out of them.

In the beginning was את…”

http://www.ancient-hebrew.org

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